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If you hold your nose and take a sip of coffee, mostly what you'll taste is a bitter liquid. Much of the gustatory pleasure we take from coffee comes from its aroma.

But a new study suggests people's sensitivity to that bitter taste plays a role in how much coffee they drink. And though it seems counterintuitive, the study shows that the more sensitive you are to the bitter taste of coffee, the more of it you tend to drink.

A startup genetics company says it's now offering to sequence your entire genome at no cost to you. In fact, you would own the data and may even be able to make money off it.

Nebula Genomics, created by the prominent Harvard geneticist George Church and his lab colleagues, seeks to upend the usual way genomic information is owned.

Newly elected Democratic mayor Arturo Garino was busy with Election Day when the Army arrived in Nogales and started erecting coils of glistening razor wire along the tops of the border wall that separates his small U.S. town from its sister in Mexico.

"Razor wire, concertina wire is not what you want to see on a fence with two countries that have been friends and traded forever," he said.

Operation Secure Line

Officials are still tallying losses and combating both growing and receding fires as several large blazes rage across California. Meanwhile, a list of missing persons in Butte County is now seven pages long, totaling some 300 names.

Saudi Arabia's public prosecutor is calling for the death penalty for five people accused of being involved in the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, the journalist and critic of the royal regime who died at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

Saudi al-Mojeb issued a statement saying that his office has indicted 11 suspects, adding that the prosecutor "has requested the death penalty for (5) individuals who are charged with ordering and committing the crime."

The five members of the team "have confessed to the murder," the prosecutor said.

A day after Deputy National Security Adviser Mira Ricardel faced public criticism from the office of the first lady, the White House on Wednesday announced that she will be leaving her post.

Ricardel "departs the White House to transition to a new role within the administration," White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said in a statement on Wednesday. Sanders did not specify the aide's new role.

In a highly unusual move on Tuesday, Melania Trump's office called publicly for the ouster of a senior member of her husband's staff earlier this week.

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., is expected to rule Thursday on CNN's lawsuit seeking immediate restoration of Chief White House Correspondent Jim Acosta's press pass.

Earlier this week, CNN sued President Trump and other White House officials, contending that they acted unconstitutionally when they stripped Acosta of his press credentials, known as a "hard pass." The network is seeking a temporary restraining order while the case plays out.

Judge Timothy Kelly, a Trump appointee, heard two hours of argument late Wednesday.

Maxine Waters of California is known as a partisan firebrand who gives as good as she gets, especially where President Trump is concerned.

Now, with Democrats assuming control of the House in January, the California Democrat is about to become more visible than ever before, with the power to slow down an important part of Trump's agenda and even shine a light on his company's finances.

Last year, the Chinese wife of a Pakistani man traveled back home to China with their two children. She wanted to introduce her younger boy, 18 months old, to her mom.

But after she landed in China's northwestern region of Xinjiang, she was detained, says her husband, a doctor named Rehman. His wife is a Uighur Muslim, a member of a minority group that has been targeted in a Chinese crackdown.

Security officials left their sons at their grandmother's house. Weeks later, they returned and took away the older boy, age 6.

The Trump administration has already written the opening chapters of what could be its most enduring legacy: the makeup of the federal courts.

In partnership with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the Trump White House has secured lifetime appointments for 29 appeals court judges and 53 district court judges. That's not to mention two Supreme Court nominees.

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