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NPR News

Power has returned to some homes walloped by the weekend 'bomb cyclone'

A person shovels out homes and cars near the Bunker Hill Monument in Boston, Mas., on January 30. Blinding snow whipped up by powerful winds pummeled the eastern United States into the early hours of January 30, as one of the strongest winter storms in years triggered transport chaos and power outages across a region of some 70 million people.
JOSEPH PREZIOSO
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AFP via Getty Images
A person shovels out homes and cars near the Bunker Hill Monument in Boston, Mas., on January 30. Blinding snow whipped up by powerful winds pummeled the eastern United States into the early hours of January 30, as one of the strongest winter storms in years triggered transport chaos and power outages across a region of some 70 million people.

Utility companies say all residents will have power back by the end of Monday.

More than 100,000 customers lost electricity over the weekend amid heavy snow and wind that slowed the recovery.

Energy company Eversource said in a news release that it had 1,700 crews working to restore power in Massachusetts after relief was sent in from Connecticut and New Hampshire.

Schools will open Monday in Boston, where the National Weather Service reported a one-day record of 23.6 inches of snow Saturday. Mayor Michelle Wu said the city's snow emergency would end Monday morning.

The "bomb cyclone" that brought freezing weather and snow over the weekend affected states along the Atlantic coast with the National Weather Service reporting 9.5 inches of snow in Wallops Island, Va.

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