Emily Means

Reporter
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Courtesy Park City Municipal

The Park City Council approved an ordinance for the Kings Crown Workforce Housing project, which will provide seven units of affordable and eight units of attainable housing on Lowell Avenue. The 15 units will contribute to the city’s larger goal of 800 units by 2026, which the council discussed at length during its annual retreat last week. 

At the retreat, Councilmember Becca Gerber said she felt strongly that the city should prioritize building housing projects within city limits, to help foster community engagement among residents in Park City proper.

KPCW Radio

Beer drinkers could find more options in their grocery stores after this legislative session, thanks to a new bill that some Utah brewers and the LDS Church oppose. 

Right now, the only beer you can buy in a Utah grocery store or convenience store is 3.2 beer, meaning the beer contains 3.2 percent alcohol content by weight. For a long time, four other states also limited sales to 3.2, but three of those–Oklahoma, Colorado and Kansas—recently voted to do away with the restriction, leaving Utah and Minnesota as the only states that require it.

Sen. Allen Christensen

Senate Bill 96, the bill that replaced full Medicaid expansion as outlined in Prop 3, was signed into law this week. Where does the lawmaker who ran the bill come down after its two-week sprint through the Utah Legislature? 

Melissa Allison

After failing in the final days of the 2018 legislative session, a state lawmaker is bringing new life to an attempt to prevent cities from banning plastic bags. 

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The two-and-a-half-hour discussion around housing policy at last week’s Park City Council retreat featured in-depth conversations about rental units and exploring building housing outside of city boundaries. But questions remain about what the role of major employers in the city is when it comes to housing their workforce.

Councilmember Lynn Ware Peek brought up the obligation of the resorts in providing housing for their employees, and at the time, Mayor Andy Beerman said it wasn’t the right forum for a larger discussion on the issue.

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Courtesy Park City Municipal

Since the announcement of Park City’s plan to create an arts and culture district in the Bonanza Park neighborhood in July 2017, residents have wondered what it will look like—and when it will be finished. 

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Courtesy Park City Municipal

Park City is holding its first stand-alone State of the City address this evening, featuring remarks from the mayor, a Q&A session with the City Council—and pie and ice cream. 

It might seem a little stuffy to have a formal event to communicate policy to the public, but Park City Mayor Andy Beerman views tonight’s State of the City forum as a way for the public and city government to socialize and talk openly about issues that are important to the community.

KPCW Radio

The Park City Council received an update Friday at its annual retreat on the progress the City has made towards filling the need for affordable housing in the community. 

The creation of affordable and attainable housing became a critical priority for the Park City Council in 2015, and in 2016 the City launched an initiative to create 800 units by 2026. Since then, 39 units have been completed, with 464 in the works and 297 yet to be funded and identified.

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Courtesy Park City Municipal

Park City continues working towards its goal of being net-zero energy by 2030. The City’s sustainability staff presented some strategies for getting there at the City Council retreat Thursday. 

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The Park City Council debated one of its critical community priorities, transportation, on Thursday at their annual retreat. They discussed long-range plans for transit and parking. KPCW’s Emily Means has more.

Park City Transportation Manager Alfred Knotts announced a goal of reducing trips by 25% by 2030, to 15 million down from 20 million in 2018. Achieving that objective would bring traffic levels back to what residents saw in 2003. Councilmember Nann Worel said people would be shocked to know the number of trips that happen in and out of town.

Utah State Capitol
KPCW Radio

A bill that would allow cyclists to yield through stop signs and intersections—when safe to do so—was given the green light at the House Transportation Committee hearing last week. KPCW’s Emily Means has more.

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Courtesy Park City Municipal

On Thursday and Friday, the Park City Council meets for its annual retreat. They’ll discuss critical and top priorities for the community. KPCW’s Emily Means has more.

Summit Land Conservancy

The Summit Land Conservancy recently closed on two properties as part of its Weber River Watershed Initiative. KPCW’s Emily Means has more.

The 44-acre Stephens Ranch in Henefer and an 82-acre ranch property in Wanship are the latest conservation easements established by the Summit Land Conservancy. Both were initiated by a 2016 federal grant.  Conservancy Executive Director Cheryl Fox says these parcels add to a patchwork of conservation easements the organization has been creating along the Weber River.

The passage of three ballot initiatives last November brought political engagement by citizens to the forefront of a statewide conversation. Now, Utah legislators have proposed amendments to that process. KPCW’s Emily Means has more.

This legislative session, there are five bills pertaining to initiative and referenda processes, and Rep. Brad Daw, a Republican from Orem, has two of them.

Utah State Capitol
KPCW Radio

Studies show most kids spend far more time on phones and computers than they do playing outside. A resolution in the state Legislature aims to encourage children to take advantage of Utah’s natural beauty and get out and play. KPCW’s Emily Means has more.

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