Rick Brough

Summit County Reporter

Known for getting all the facts right, as well as his distinctive sign-off, Rick covers Summit County meetings and issues. KPCW snagged him from The Park Record in the '80s, and he's been on air and covering the entire county ever since. He produces the Week In Review podcast, as well a heads the Friday Film Review team.

Rick is also a pop-culture savant (who would bury you in Trivial Pursuit), which makes him the perfect host for KPCW's weekend interview show of filmmakers, actors and critics during the Sundance Film Festival. Revealing his darker side, you can catch him every Friday afternoon with Randy Barton on The Local View discussing which celebrities passed on that week.

Other features on Mr. Brough include:

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Dakota Pacific

The Snyderville Planning Commission, hosting their first public hearing for the large Dakota Pacific proposal at Kimball Junction, heard from speakers mostly critical of the plan.

A number of them urged the Snyderville Commisisoners to recommend a denial.   They argued the project will accelerate growth in the  area, and said the county can do better with a large, important piece of property at the entryway to Park City.

After months of discussion, the Snyderville Planning Commission Tuesday night denied a Conditional Use Permit to convert the former Colby School Building into a Bed and Breakfast.  

The applicants for the Colby site proposed to turn the building into a B and B for eight guests plus a kitchen.

But Planning Commissioners struggled over several meetings with a requirement saying that for the business to be considered a Bed and Breakfast, it has to be an owner-occupied residence.

@SummitCountyUT

The East Side Planning Commission, at their last meeting, got an update on the study process that’s been underway for over a year, on the Cedar Crest Village Overlay plan in Hoytsville.

The East Side Planning Commissioners involved in the study are generally supportive of the plan.

In April of last year, 27 property owners, holding a combined 1100 acres around Hoytsville, submitted a Village Overlay application.    The following month, the County Council approved an Overlay Study Area and appointed seven of the owners to a committee.

Park City Institute

The Park City Institute, like many other non-profits in recent months, had to deal with cancelled events and hard choices.    But  they had some good news on another front.

The new Institute Director, Ari Ioannides, officially took over his position on March 1st—pretty bad timing, he admitted, on the verge of the coronavirus outbreak and the lockdowns.

Since then, he’s had to cancel their summer series, and events such as Saints and Sinners.   But on the bright side, he was able to get the Institute’s financial house in order during the early months of the year.    

@SummitCountyUT

Members of the East County Planning Commission showed some mixed feelings, in their latest discussion about a proposed 200-unit project off Highway 248, with affordable or attainable housing.

The planners, looking at the Whisper Ridge proposal on June 18th, were concerned about the project’s location,  impact on traffic, and whether the units will be affordable for residents on the East Side.

An attorney for the Summit Water Company has filed a motion, asking a Third District Court judge to delay his order, calling for a shareholder meeting of the private water firm.

Judge Richard Mrazik called for the shareholders to meet no later than July 23rd.     But the water company is pleading that it needs time to file an appeal.   It’s the latest development in a nearly-two-year-old legal fight between Summit Water and the original founders of the company.

Utah’s June 30 primary election is being conducted entirely through ballots mailed to citizens.

But that has led the ACLU of Utah to object that most Utah counties don’t provide pre-paid postage for the ballots.      That group includes Summit County.

On its website, the ACLU says that out of 29 counties in Utah, 18 don’t provide postage.   The organization said that voting should be easy and accessible, and contended that even the cost of a stamp can be a barrier to voting.

Summit County, like many other state and local governments, is receiving aid from the federal CARES Act.

The County Council on June 17th  discussed their priorities for using that funding, including what it can and can’t be spent for.

The Council heard at their last meeting that under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, Summit County could receive, at most, nearly $6 million.

It is due to come in three allocations and has to be spent before the end of the year.   The county has received the first, nearly $2 million.

Summit County

The Summit County Council had a long discussion Wednesday about how their budget and revenues are affected by the COVID-19 outbreak and the subsequent lockdowns.

But Council Chair Doug Clyde said at this point, they’re still facing a lot of unknowns about what the summer and fall will bring.  

The council heard from their Chief Financial Officer Matt Leavitt, about the hit their revenues took during that March-to-May period.    But he said they don’t know if they’re facing a worst-case scenario yet.       

Dakota Pacific Real Estate

Developers for the proposed Dakota Pacific mixed-use neighborhood at Kimball Junction hosted their second online Open House in recent weeks.

During the session on June 16th, they responded to questions about their workforce housing, impacts on traffic, and other items.

The Dakota plan is going to a public hearing next week before the Snyderville Planning Commission.

The Director of Development for Dakota, Jeff Gochnour, said the project is located on 60 acres.   The land was approved for the Boyer Tech Park in 2008.

The Snyderville Recreation District is updating its Strategic Action Plan for the first time in seven years.

The District is presenting the plan, and taking input, at a virtual meeting this Thursday.

Recreation District Director Brian Hanton said that the Zoom meeting is on Thursday the 18th, from 6 to 8 p.m.   To find out how to access the session, go to the District’s website and link to the Events tab.

He said the last time they formulated the Action Plan was in 2013.     

Ken Lund on Flickr

The Coalville Planning Commission on Monday night voted unanimously to recommend a revised version of the Wohali Development.

The proposal is a scaled-down version of a rural golf course and residential development, in the hills west of Interstate 80.     There has been a debate about how an increased number of nightly-rental units will fit in the plan.

The Planning Commission session was held live, rather than online, at the Ledges Center.     About 35 people attended, but were required to wear masks and maintain social distancing.

Summit County Sheriff's Office

Due to current events, a number of policing practices are being scrutinized and debated.   One of those is the no-knock warrant.

Asked about that, Summit County Sheriff Justin Martinez said he would not abolish no-knock searches.    But he says they are more the exception than the rule.  

The Sheriff said there are circumstances where a no-knock search is warranted.     

Summit County Sheriff Justin Martinez

The nation-wide protests about police brutality and the death of young black men have re-focused attention on the issue of how to improve and refom police departments.

Summit County Sheriff Justin Martinez says he has thought about that even before the current controversies.  

Sheriff Martinez said his job is to think constantly about how to improve his department and make it more community-centric.

But he said with funding already tight for the Sheriff’s Office, he doesn’t agree with the calls to “Defund the Police.”       

Summit County Sheriff's Office

While protests and turmoil rock the country over the death of George Floyd, Summit County’s Sheriff says that he, his deputies, and all the officers he knows are universally disgusted and horrified about how Floyd died.

Sheriff Justin Martinez talked to us on Friday, before the country was shaken by another incident—the shooting death in Atlanta of Rayshard Brooks.

Sheriff Martinez said in recent weeks, he and his officers have felt a mixture of emotions.       

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