Summit County Prefer More Transit Runs On SR 248 Without Adding Pavement

Jul 12, 2019

It is not official yet, but one Summit County Council member says they’re ready to join with Park City and ask UDOT not to add any more pavement to Highway 248 coming into town.

County Council Member Doug Clyde told KPCW that he thinks the County Council, like their counterparts at the city, want to promote transit on 248 and Kearns Boulevard.

“Not in any formal way, but just in casual conversation,” Clyde explained. “I think we’re aligned with Park City on this issue, in that nobody, including Park City and including ourselves, wants to see the widening as proposed by UDOT.  What we do want to see is some transit-oriented improvements, that would include perhaps a bus rapid-transit lane, and various signalized intersections that give deference to bus traffic, so that we can work through our goal of attempting to  capture more people with transit, rather than driving them through town.”

A major source of the traffic jams on the highway comes from Wasatch County. Clyde agreed that talking to leaders there about a transit link is part of the future.

“There’s no question that our transit issues go beyond the limits of our county,” Clyde continued. “How we deal with the transit from Wasatch—obviously we have a large number of employees living over in Wasatch County.   To the extent we can capture them by transit, that’s something we should be looking at.   We have not even broached that subject yet.

County Council Member Doug Clyde. Highway 248 also connects to the South Summit area. Clyde said a bus connection there is making decent headway and has been well-received.

Meanwhile, discussing the highway Thursday night, the Park City Council agreed that the project is too much asphalt and it doesn’t reaffirm their transit priority. But they haven’t decided on a resolution just yet, since they are still taking public input.

At this point, Council Members did say they’ve only heard criticism from the public about the project.