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Utah Supreme Court allows Hideout to annex part of Summit County

Hideout, established in 2008, consists of multiple neighborhoods overlooking the Jordanelle Reservoir in Wasatch County.
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Hideout, established in 2008, consists of multiple neighborhoods overlooking the Jordanelle Reservoir in Wasatch County.

The county had previously blocked Hideout’s attempted annexation of eastern Richardson Flat in district court.

Thursday’s ruling in Hideout’s favor reverses 4th District Court's decision.

Hideout is seeking to annex over 300 acres southeast of the Richardson Flat park and ride. The land in question is owned by Larry H. Miller Real Estate, and Hideout would like to develop a town center there.

The town began annexation in 2020, when for just over 100 days, the state legislature allowed municipalities to annex unincorporated areas without filing a petition or getting permission from the relevant county.

Hideout, which is in Wasatch County, had started to annex part of Richardson Flat in Summit County. The town made sure the annexation would be connected to the rest of its land by including a “cherry stem” of land along state Route 248.

The land under dispute is in blue.
Brief of Appellee
/
Summit County
The land under dispute is in blue.

Summit County challenged the move in court after Hideout failed to complete the annexation before the law changed again.

In 2021, 4th District Court said that fact meant Hideout couldn’t finalize its annexation.

Thursday, the Utah Supreme Court reversed the lower court's ruling. It found Summit County can’t legally oppose Hideout’s annexation.

"We fought this as hard as possible and ran it all the way to the top," Summit County Attorney Margaret Olson said in a statement. "We respect court rulings and will be evaluating the situation in coming weeks."

Hideout's town attorney did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

"We look forward to working collaboratively with our local government colleagues and community partners to meet the progressive planning goals exemplified by our regional leaders as well as to meet the critical infrastructure requirements of Hideout," Town Administrator Jan McCosh said in a statement.

Summit County was the only governmental entity opposing Hideout’s annexation, so it’s likely the town will be able to complete it. It's been about a year and a half since the parties made oral arguments at the state's high court.

Park City confirmed Hideout's proposed annexation does not overlap with Park City's 2022 annexation of western Richardson Flat.

A subsidiary of Larry H. Miller Real Estate opposed that annexation in 3rd District Court but lost. The developer has since offered to partner with Park City on affordable housing in the area.

This is a developing story.

Updated: June 14, 2024 at 3:05 PM MDT
This story was updated with a statement from Jan McCosh, Hideout's town administrator:

"We respect the Utah Supreme Court’s recent decision. We look forward to working collaboratively with our local government colleagues and community partners to meet the progressive planning goals exemplified by our regional leaders as well as to meet the critical infrastructure requirements of Hideout.

 "We have a unique opportunity to work together as community leaders to help address traffic congestion, air quality and improved trail connection for the greater Wasatch Back as it continues to grow as a world class destination for people to live, work and play."
Corrected: June 14, 2024 at 11:49 AM MDT
A previous version of this story said the Utah Court of Appeals also ruled on the case; this is wrong: Hideout appealed 4th District Court's ruling directly to the Utah Supreme Court.
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