book review

January Book Review: 'A Woman Of No Importance'

Jan 26, 2021

The book, A Woman of No Importance  The Untold Story of the American Spy Who Helped Win World War II by Sonia Purnell is the true story of an American woman, Virginia Hall, who lived, survived and even excelled in the 'man's world' of espionage and war in France during World War II.

November Book Review: 'Likes'

Nov 10, 2020

The book “Likes” is great escape and a reminder of what’s real, and what’s not, in these unsettling times. Summit County Librarian Kirsten Nilsson, has this month’s KPCW Book Review.

You know, lately, with all our divisive national politics, racial tensions, a world pandemic and even murder hornets, I’ve really longed for some way to escape it all. And, as a librarian, you know I’m going to tell you that reading can take you lots of places, really anywhere you want to go.

Living through the Covid-19 pandemic has changed our lives in ways large and small. A new collection of essays and poems explores various ways we are reacting to and coping with this uninvited guest.  Amy Mills has this month’s book review of Alone Together: Love, Grief, and Comfort in the Time of Covid-19.

Flatiron Books

 

 

American Dirt by Jeanine Cummings, hailed as “‘The Grapes of Wrath’ for our times,” was Oprah's Book Club selection in January. By March there was so much controversy the book tour was canceled.

 

Chapter one: “One of the very first bullets comes in from the open window above the toilet where Luca is standing. He doesn't understand immediately that it is a bullet at all, and it's only luck it doesn't strike him between the eyes.”

 

Little, Brown and Company

Great historical fiction combines engrossing entertainment with fresh details of places, times, and people different from our own. The best historical fiction does that and makes it relevant and meaningful today.

 

How do people in power use their office to control citizens? Kiran Millwood Hargrave’s historical fiction of Norway four hundred years ago feels surprisingly timely.

 

Fans of author Erin Morgenstern who fell in love with her debut novel The Night Circus in 2011, have been eagerly awaiting a second novel. The Starless Sea was published in November 2019. Here, with a plug for both, is Barb Bretz with this month’s book review.

December Book Review- 'Blowout' by Rachel Maddow

Dec 10, 2019

Is it possible for a global industry to undermine democracies and trigger earthquakes? MSNBC political analyst and commentator Rachel Maddow turns her discerning eye toward the oil and gas industry in this compelling expose.


Esi Edugyan’s new novel mashes up two unlikely story lines—it’s part Jules Verne adventure and part heart-breaking escaped slave narrative. The heart of the story is devoted friendship and the complicated meaning of freedom. This month’s book review is Washington Black.

Face to face encounters with the wild are an everyday occurrence in Wasatch and Summit counties. How we think about those encounters is at the heart of the new book Reimagining a Place for the Wild edited by Leslie Miller.

Walking the trash cans out to the curb last week, I was dive-bombed by a hawk. This creature left no doubt that she was on the attack and that I was her target. Terrified, I jumped under a tree while she hovered above. This was a stunningly beautiful, immense bird, and I had to acknowledge that in that moment, she was in control.

July Book Review - 'American Wolf' by Nate Blakeslee

Jul 9, 2019

A great theme in Western life is the relationship between man and Nature, or man and the untamed wild. That’s a strong theme in this month’s book review of American Wolf

American Wolf explores this theme of man and Nature through the life of one extraordinary Yellowstone wolf known as 06 for the year she was born. We know the facts of her life, thanks to the Yellowstone Wolf Project and its founder, biologist Doug Smith. From his helicopter, he tracks the park’s collared wolves, marking the range of each pack through the seasons.

You could say that Us Against You is a sports story about a hockey town and its team and you wouldn't be wrong, but it is about so much more.

Since his debut novel A Man Called Ove, written and published in 2014, Fredrik Backman cranked out one a year -   the last two being Beartown and Us Against You.

Between the years 1921 and 1924 at least 24 Osage Indians had been murdered and local officials did nothing to capture and punish the perpetrators. Newspapers across the country referred to this period as the "Osage Reign of Terror".

This month's review is of Killers of the Flower Moon: Oil, Money, Murder, and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann.

Every now and then a book comes along that is both universally pertinent and utterly timely. The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border by Francisco Cantu manages to be both timeless and urgent at once.

Determined to leave a home, more dysfunctional than she even realizes, and get a formal eduction is the mission on which Tara Westover embarks. Here's this month's book review of Educated by Tara Westover.

On the October New York Times Bestseller list, two memoirs made the top 10; In Pieces by Sally Field, age 72 and Educated; a Memoir by Tara Westover, age 31.

One might doubt a person could accumulate enough interesting life experiences in 30 years to compile a memoir. In this case, one would be wrong.

January Book Review – The Masterpiece

Jan 8, 2019

An iconic train station and the 1920s New York art world form the backdrop to the intriguing historical novel, The Masterpiece.

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