Christian Center of Park City

Christian Center Of Park City / CCPC Back to School Basics

There are about one in five children in Park City who are, by federal standards, considered low-income. The Christian Center of Park City has the Back to School Basics Fund Raiser under way to help children in need be prepared and excited for that first day of school.

The Christian Center of Park City is now a sign-up location for those seeking SNAP benefits.

SNAP stands for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. The program, formerly known as food stamps, allows lower income U.S. residents to purchase groceries. The Christian Center of Park City Programs Director Pete Stoughton explains the nonprofit Utahns Against Hunger approached the center after learning CCPC’s food pantry serves over 1,000 families a month.

KPCW Radio

Utah Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox visited the Christian Center of Park City Monday, as part of his tour of all 248 cities and towns in Utah for his 2020 gubernatorial campaign. 

Christian Center of Park City

Two Park City residents came up with the same winning name for the new special event space at the Park City Christian Center. KPCW’s Leslie Thatcher has more.

The 2,500 square foot  special event space opened earlier this year but until now, it was nameless. The Christian Center staged a naming contest in March and recently chose the winner – in this case winners.  Christian Center Special Events and Marketing Director Debbi LaBelle says both Nina Chartrand and Teresa Tackman we named as winners for submitting the name The Gathering Place.

KPCW Radio

On a given Monday or Thursday, the Park City Senior Center sees anywhere from 20 to 45 people coming through for lunch and socializing. Many who have made it part of their routine are having difficulty grappling with the impending transition to the Christian Center of Park City, when construction on the Woodside Park Phase 2 housing development closes the center. 

“I like all my people. I do not want to move. But, things happen.”

KPCW Radio

As construction on the Woodside Park Phase II housing development begins, one group will also be looking for a new home—the seniors who attend activities at the center on Woodside Ave. 

park city police

This winter, Park City Police watch logs have reflected a number of incidents where police have interacted with people experiencing homelessness at transit centers or outside of businesses. Park City Police Capt. Phil Kirk says that doesn’t mean there are more homeless individuals—they’re probably just more visible.

Kirk says homelessness has become more of a year-round issue in Park City. Police will often see people camping during the summer, but the cold winter has likely brought people into town seeking warmer shelters.

Christian Center of Park City

The Christian Center’s new event space fits 208 people, has a commercial kitchen and mountain views. What it doesn’t have is a name, so the Center is enlisting the community to help change that. 

Christian Center Executive Director Rob Harter says the Center could have considered selling the naming rights to one individual donor, but they wanted it to reflect the Park City community.

Christian Center of Park City

Last week, three Park City businesses were acknowledged for their commitments to sustainability in the past year. KPCW’s Emily Means has more.

Recycle Utah recognized The Christian Center of Park City as the Green Business of the Year at its recent Green Business Awards, with Deer Valley Resort receiving the People’s Choice Award and Riverhorse on Main the Zest for Zero award.

Christian Center of Park City

The Christian Center of Park City is giving local residents the chance to help underprivileged families this holiday season. Operation Hope is back serving both Park City and Heber.

Rob Harter, Executive Director of Christian Center of Park City, explains that Operation Hope, now in its eighth year, helps underprivileged families with gifts for Christmas.

Pete Stoughton of the Christian Center joins Tim Henney and Lynn Ware Peek to talk about a group of students who come to town each year, primarily from the southern hemisphere, who search out viable and affordable places to live for four months. Pete talks about what we can do as a community to help house these young people. 

KPCW

The Local News Hour today features conversations with Bill Rock, COO of Park City, Robin Marrouche of the Kimball Art Center and artist Bill Kranstover about the Chairs for Charity silent auction this week.  Rock also talks about the Vail Epic Promise Foundation.  Then, it's Tom Kelly with the US Ski and Snowboard Association, Jenny Mauer from the Christian Center, and Michelle McDonald and Kate Boyd from the Park Silly Sunday Market Holiday Bazaar coming up at the end of the week. 

On today's program, host Leslie Thatcher speaks with outgoing Utah Avalanche Center Director Bruce Tremper on his nearly 30 year career with the Center. Park City Planners Anya Grahn and Kirsten Whetstone discuss Wednesdays' Park City Planning Commission agenda items, PC MARC Wellness Coordinator Dondee Sherer-Likes and Mary Closser with Recycle Utah talk about Wednesday's free Lunchtime Learning and Jenny Mauer and Kelsey Teegen with the Christian Center of Park City talk about Saturday's Hike for Hunger fundraiser.

On today's Local News Hour, host Leslie Thatcher speaks with State Representative Kraig Powell (R) about his efforts to amend Utah laws now that same-sex marriage is law of the land. Rena Jordan and Bob Radke with the Snyderville Basin Recreation District have an update on a possible new indoor field house, new trail builds underway and the plans for a 224 crossing. Jenny Mauer with the Park City Christian Center has details on the annual Back 2 Schools Basics event coming up next month. They're looking for money and volunteers.