elections

Perry Rose

Eight Heber residents are running for three city council seats opening up in 2020. A Primary on August 13th will narrow the eight candidates down to six before the municipal general election November 5th.

Heber City resident Perry Rose spent 20 years with the Heber Police Department before starting and running a private investigation security business that he sold after 10 years. Rose says being raised in Heber and working for the city government has helped qualify him to be on the council.

Eight Heber residents are running for three city council seats opening up in 2020. A Primary on August 13th will narrow the eight candidates down to six before the municipal general election November 5th.

Heber resident Nick Lopez works as a firefighter for the Salt Lake City Fire Department. He says that along with his military experience help qualify him to be on the Heber City Council.

Brady Flygare

Eight Heber residents are running for three city council seats opening up in 2020. A Primary on August 13th will narrow the eight candidates down to six before the municipal general election November 5th.

Heber City Council candidate Brady Flygare grew up in Orem Utah, but he spent plenty of his childhood in the valley as his grandfather grew up in Heber. Flygare moved to Heber about two years ago with his wife and four children. He says his work as the director of operations for a nonprofit senior living company qualifies him for the council.

Ryan Stack

Eight Heber residents are running for three city council seats opening up in 2020. A Primary on August 13th will narrow the eight candidates down to six before the municipal general election November 5th.

Heber City Council candidate Ryan Stack has lived in Heber for more than five years. Stack works as a prosecutor in the Summit County Attorney office. He says that amongst other reasons makes him qualified to be on the council.

The filing period for municipal elections across Utah started Monday and runs through tomorrow, June 7. A number of city council seats in Summit and Wasatch Counties are open for election.

In Summit County, Park City, Kamas, Coalville and Oakley have three council seats open for four-year terms. Additionally, Oakley has one two-year seat up for election. Francis has two council seats available for four-year terms.

Deanna Rhodes declared her candidacy for Park City Council on Thursday

The filing period for municipal elections across Utah starts today and runs through this Friday, June 7. A number of city council seats in Summit and Wasatch Counties are open for election.

In Summit County, Park City, Kamas, Coalville and Oakley have three council seats open for four-year terms. Additionally, Oakley has one two-year seat up for election. Francis has two council seats available for four-year terms.

The State of Utah saw final county canvass results posted Tuesday afternoon. There was a blue wave in Summit County but there’s partially because there were no Republican candidates.

Residents of Summit County voted for seven county officials but of those seven races only one political party was represented. Summit County Sheriff Justin Martinez says he’d like to see more participation.

While Election Day happened over a week ago, results across the state and even in the Wasatch Back have remained too close to call.

Republican Tim Quinn and Democrat Meaghan Miller are separated by less than 400 votes in the Utah House 54 race, candidates and their supporters are encouraging voters to check the status of their ballots. Meanwhile statewide Proposition 4, which would create an independent re-districting commission to prevent gerrymandering is separated by less than one-half-of a percent.

Meaghan Miller For House 54 Facebook page

Meaghan Miller was a long shot to win the Utah House District 54.  Although she she trails by 400 votes, Miller was pleased with the result.

Democrat Meaghan Miller was happy to win 48% of the vote in district 54. Miller explains why she thinks she was relatively successful.

RonaldWinterton.com

Republican Ronald Winterton won the State Senate 26 seat. Previously held by Senator Kevin Van Tassell. KPCW Spoke with the newly elected state senator.

Uintah basin resident Ron Winterton comes to Utah’s State senate with years of experience in transportation and local government.

Utah House of Representatives

With a 400 vote win over Democrat Meaghan Miller, Republican Representative Tim Quinn will retain his seat in the Utah House of representatives.

Republican Tim Quinn represents State House district 54 which covers Summit and Wasatch County. Quinn spoke with KPCW the day after the election. He said the legislature will be busy making adjustments to the three propositions that Utah citizens passed.

Utah House

Republican Incumbent Logan Wilde won another term in the Utah State House of Representatives. 

Logan Wilde defeated Democratic Chris Neville, a Park City resident for Utah House seat 53. Wilde says that with polling surveys before the election they expected the win. But they were surprised by the results of some of Utah’s propositions.

Nonbinding Opinion Question 1 which was the 10 cents per gallon gas tax increase for education, failed. It was an advisory bill that would have supported funding for roads allowing other transportation dollars to be diverted for education funding.

Question 1 was voted down 66 to 44 percent. The nonbinding opinion question was an advisory bill written to gauge voter interest. The initiative would have required Utah legislatures to pass another bill to support the tax increase.

On election day, the vote count at the Summit County Clerk’s office had to deal with a last-minute surge of in-person voters, and a level of voter enthusiasm that has probably set a record for a midterm election.

Summit County Clerk Kent Jones said that on Tuesday night, they counted about 17,000 ballots. Those were comprised of mail-in ballots they had received up to but not including Tuesday—and ballots placed in the county drop-boxes, up until 3:00 pm Tuesday.

Utah’s population is growing as is the economy. People are moving in, jobs are plentiful, and the legislature passed a tax increase last year that will help equalize school funding and help pay for the student growth throughout the state.

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