Heber Light and Power

VOLT

Midway City, Rocky Mountain Power and Heber Light and Power have settled a dispute over the installation of high-power transmission lines. The settlement comes after years of public input, negotiations, and legal wrangling.

Heber Light & Power

Heber Light & Power is conducting a survey amongst their customers to look at where future energy should come from for the utility.

Every five years or so Heber Light and Power conducts an integrated resource plan to take a look at the company’s current power portfolio and look ahead to the future. General Manager Jason Norlen says part of that plan includes a survey of customers.

Heber Light & Power

Heber Light & Power customers may see a slight increase in their upcoming power bills. The power company says the increases are a result of increasing expenses and growth.

Heber Light and Power will have a 4% rate increase starting October 1st across all classes. General Manager Jason Norlen says that the average customers bill will go up a little over three dollars a month. Norlen says the key driver for the rate increase is growing costs.

HEAL Utah

As Heber Light and Power has signed on to participate in what’s known as the Carbon Free Power Project, a watchdog group wants to have a community discussion about the potential effects of the small nuclear reactor that will power the system. 

Heber Light and Power

Heber Light and Power and Rocky Mountain Power’s permit for a transmission line project that will connect power from the Jordanelle Dam to the Midway was continued last week by the Wasatch Planning Commission. One major consideration is whether to place those transmission lines underground or overhead. 

The proposed plan will result in transmission poles that will be between 65 to 95 feet. In order to lower the overall height of the poles, the power companies are burying the distribution and communication lines where possible.

Wasatch County

Wasatch County Planning Commission spent four hours at their June 4th meeting discussing a request from Heber Light and Power and Rocky Mountain Power for a conditional use permit to rebuild and extend a transmission line and build a 10-acre substation. In the end the item was continued to the commissions July 11th meeting to allow more discussion and information regarding the substation.

Around 50 people attended the commission meeting, most in the audience were citizens opposed to the plans.

Midway City

The Midway City Council passed a height restriction ordinance in Tuesday’s meeting. It was done after a vote taken by the Heber Light and Power board last month approved a project that would install high power transmission lines through the Heber Valley.  Carolyn Murray has this:

Midway Mayor, Celeste Johnson told KPCW the City passed the ordinance hoping it would give them more say in the future of the project. 

Heber Light and Power

The idea of power lines, possibly as tall as 100 feet, running through the Heber Valley has some residents up in arms, but members of the Heber Valley Light and Power board think they might have found a way to mitigate citizens’ concerns.

Heber Valley Light and Power and Rocky Mountain Power are working to install transmission lines spanning from the Jordanelle Dam to the Midway substation, about ten miles, but Heber Mayor Kelleen Potter says the facilities committee may have found a solution that could possible reduce the impact of the powerlines on the view corridor.

Heber Light and Power

Heber Light and Power Company and Rocky Mountain Power return to the Wasatch Planning Commission on Thursday to request a Conditional Use Permit for the construction of the Jordanelle-Midway Transmission Line continuation through the Heber Valley. A citizens group known as VOLT wants people to know about the special work session and to encourage citizens to show up at the planning meeting. Last December, the Planning Commission asked the applicants to return with more information including studies evaluating the costs of burying some of the lines. Carolyn Murray has this:

Wasatch County

Rocky Mountain Power Company and the municipal power company, Heber Light and Power, are evaluating the feasibility of burying new high power lines through the Heber Valley. The community has expressed opposition to the original plan which would run the 100 foot power poles through sensitive view corridors. Rocky Mountain Power would pay for the costs of installing above ground lines but the Heber Valley Community would have to pay for the difference in costs to bury them.   Carolyn Murray has this:

Wasatch County with View of Mt. Timpanogas

The Heber Light and Power is considering entering into an energy contract with a small Nuclear Power plant, not yet built, in Corvallis, Oregon.  Heber Light and Power is an Interlocal, community owned power company providing energy to the Heber Valley. With projected downscaling and decommissioning of coal plants, the community is looking for replacement energy sources. They’re considering a power contract with the Nuclear Power Company, NuScale. Carolyn Murray has this update.

Heber Light and Power

The Heber Light and Power Board will take a trip to Corvallis, Oregon to learn about a small nuclear power plant currently under construction and to consider investment opportunities including buying future energy.  They continue negotiations with Rocky Mountain Power to find alternatives to installing giant power transmission lines through the heart of the Heber Valley. Carolyn Murray has this update:

Heber City Airport

During Kelleen Potter’s successful campaign for Heber City mayor last November, she pledged to reform how city government deals with growth and how the Heber City Council communicates with constituents.  Potter, who is also now Chairman of Heber Light & Power, conducts her first meeting with the company’s board today at 4pm.  Carolyn Murray has this

Residents Of The Heber Valley Oppose New Power Project

Dec 11, 2017

A group of Wasatch County residents, calling themselves, VOLT, wants to put a stop to a project to install high voltage power lines through Wasatch County. The group claims the agreement was made without public input. Carolyn Murray has this: 

Heber Light and Power is considering a 6-percent rate increase this year for its more than 11-thousand customers. Leslie Thatcher has more.

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