History

Author Zachary Karabel’s joins us this morning to talk about his new book, Inside Money: Brown Brothers Harriman and the American Way of Power. The book highlights the relationships between money and power over time.

  

Cada Domingo - Laila Villanueva

Aug 18, 2019

Laila Villanueva 
Executive Director 
Artes de Mexico en Utah 

We introduced Laila Villanueva, the new Executive Director with AMU, the organization's mission and we will discuss the programs and services that this organization offers such as the podcast "Nuevas Voces" podcast, the art exhibitions, the Sor Juana Prize for prose and poems in Spanish, and much more!

Cada Domingo - Veronica Fajardo, Luis Fajardo

Jul 14, 2019

  We visited the recent history of Nicaragua, the contexts as viewed by someone living in that country during the uprising and change of power between the Sandinistas and the revolutionaries. Recently, the country's constitution included planned changes to the country's Social Security system, which led to protests in which 38 people died. We also discussed how these events affect the members of our Nicaraguan community.

Did you know one of the largest drug busts in Park City took place in 1915?

This is Bill Redeker with your weekly Park City History Bit.

In the late 1800’s, mining wasn’t a glamorous job – it was a dirty, dangerous and almost always a fatal occupation. Miners liked to drink and carouse to escape things going on in their lives. But alcohol wasn’t the only thing used to forget their troubles – the world’s oldest natural drug, opium, was also used.  

Did you know at one time, Park City’s most distinguished landmark was a building, and not the mountains?

This is Hope Woodside with your weekly Park City History Bit.

The local landmark known as the Coalition Building was the lower terminal of the Silver King Mining Company’s aerial tramway. It was located on Park Avenue, north, or downhill, of the Kimball Art Center. 

This is Hope Woodside with your weekly Park City History Bit.

On July 5, 1905, spectators watching the Rio Grande Western train depart were horrified to see the engine suddenly rear up, topple down the embankment and settle on its side - just a thousand feet from the depot. 

News of the wreck spread quickly around Park City. 

Steam spewed from the broken engine and famous local ball player George Spillman made the courageous and risky move to jump inside the train’s cab to close the air valve.

Did you know the “King of Denmark’s” saloon helped Park City recover from the Great Fire of 1898?

This is Bill Redeker with your weekly Park City History Bit.

George Wanning was born around 1859 in Denmark, arriving in Park City in the late 1870s. Wanning helped build the town, but what might have been his most significant mark on local history was his saloon.

Did you remember how you used to get up the ski hill?

This is Chris Waddell with your weekly Park City History Bit.

When Treasure Mountains Resort (now Park City Mountain Resort) opened in 1963, it featured the Prospector double chairlift, two J-bars and a two-and-a-half-mile aerial tramway, said to be the longest in North America. A four-passenger gondola from the resort base to the top of Pinion Ridge quickly became a popular attraction.

Did you know Park City’s first ski resort was actually started by two ski buddies? 

This is Bill Redeker with your weekly Park City History Bit.

“Snow Park”, as the resort was called, was built in the summer of 1946 where lower Deer Valley Resort is today and was named after the local ski club. The founders were two friends, Otto Carpenter and Bob Burns. 

The original lift, called the Ottobahn, was a T-bar. When the T-bars were unoccupied, they would drag in the snow, get caught and start pulling down the lift. 

Whose life was more valuable in 1899 – a horse’s or a miner’s?

This is Diane Foster, with your weekly Park City History Bit.

Did you know that it was considered bad luck for a woman to work underground in the mines? This is Hope Woodside with your weekly Park City History Bit. It wasn’t until 1974 that the first woman worked in a Park City mine, and the one who led the way was Shelley Christiansen, hired to operate a hoist 1,500 feet below the surface.

Do you think Park City would be as popular as it is today if it still took four hours to get here?

This is Bill Redeker with your weekly Park City History Bit.

In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, horse-drawn stagecoaches were frequently running up and down the canyon between Salt Lake City and Park City. “Stagecoaches” got their name from the different stages the drivers stopped at to change out tired horses. The four-hour trip through the canyon required four stops. 

A piece of U.S. history, from the cataclysm of 9-11, could be coming to Utah. Organizers are asking for financial help with the effort. Rick Brough has more.

Premiered July 25, 2013 

Did you ever wonder why a siren goes off in Old Town every night?

This is Diane Foster, with your weekly Park City History Bit.

Lots of locals have their own theories why the siren goes off every night – from calling home miners from the bordellos and bars to checking that everyone made it out of the mines alive. The truth, however, is more practical and nostalgic.

Did you know Park City’s rich and famous have been making tabloid fodder for more than 100 years?

This is Hope Woodside with your weekly Park City History Bit.

If People magazine had existed a century ago, Utah’s Silver Queen, Susanna Bransford, would have dominated the cover. Her Park City mining fortune and flamboyant lifestyle made her a darling of national magazines and newspapers. After all, she married and outlived four husbands, including a Russian prince.

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