Hog Farmers Scramble to Drain Waste Pools Ahead Of Hurricane Florence

Sep 11, 2018
Originally published on September 11, 2018 6:55 pm

Just inland from the North Carolina coast, right in the path of Hurricane Florence, there's an area where there are many more pigs than people. Each big hog farm has one or more open-air "lagoons" filled with manure, and some could be vulnerable to flooding if the hurricane brings as much rain as feared.

Katy Langley lives downstream from many of those farms. "When you fly over the area, you can't throw a rock without hitting one," she says. "You see these long barns and these square shapes that are Pepto Bismol pink, because swine waste is bright pink. Fun fact of the day!"

It's actually bacteria, feeding on the waste, that turn the ponds pink. These lagoons are like a pile of compost. They're a cheap way to handle animal waste.

But for Langley, the lagoons are a threat. She works for an environmentalist organization called Sound Rivers, and she's specifically assigned to protect the Neuse River. With thousands of those lagoons just sitting there, open to the weather, with a Category 4 hurricane on the way, Langley is worried that a whole lot of manure is going to wash into the rivers.

Farmers are worried, too.

"We're probably going to get hit on the nose with this, so flooding's our biggest concern," says Marlowe Vaughan of Ivy Spring Creek Farm in Goldsboro, N.C.

The hog houses themselves are safe from flooding, she says, but paths leading to them could be flooded, so that workers will have to get to them by boat.

On her farm, they're spending part of the day pumping liquid waste out of their lagoons, spraying it as fertilizer on nearby fields, so there's more room for incoming rainfall.

Experts at North Carolina State University say that if farmers manage to do this ahead of the hurricane, lagoons should be able to handle almost three feet of rain.

But these facilities haven't ever been forced to accommodate that much rain. I ask Vaughan if the ponds really could handle such a deluge.

"We don't really know," she says. "I mean, we try to pump down as much as we can, but after that, it's kind of in God's hands. We're kind of at the mercy of the storm."

Here's the really bad scenario: Water starts overflowing and erodes the lagoon wall, causing a wall to collapse, spreading animal waste across the landscape and into rivers.

Rising rivers could also inundate some low-lying lagoons and hog houses. About 60 of them lie within what the state of North Carolina considers the 100-year-flood plain. Animals in those houses may need to be evacuated for the flood waters rise.

There used to be more swine in the flood plain, but after Hurricane Floyd, in 1999, the state bought out some hog farmers in low-lying areas and shut them down.

Some lagoons flooded again during Hurricane Matthew, two years ago, but lagoon walls didn't collapse.

But Vaughan says, history may not be a guide. It sounds like Florence could be worse. "We really just don't know," she says. "We have no idea what's going to happen. So everybody's very worried and very concerned. Please pray for us!"

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Hundreds of thousands of Palestinians live in Jerusalem, but those outside the city can't get there without hard-to-get permits, restrictions Israel says are necessary for security. One group found a way in for a unique purpose - an orchestra that went to play one of the world's most famous symphonies. Sandy Tolan reports on the musicians' journey.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: (Vocalizing).

SANDY TOLAN, BYLINE: On the wooded grounds of an East Jerusalem guesthouse run by French nuns, musicians from all over the world are getting ready - bassists, cellists, the trombones, the woodwinds...

(SOUNDBITE OF THE RAMALLAH ORCHESTRA WARM-UP)

TOLAN: ...And the whole orchestra and chorus - 200 people under a giant tent - The Ramallah Orchestra's last rehearsal before their Jerusalem performance of Beethoven's ninth symphony.

(SOUNDBITE OF THE RAMALLAH ORCHESTRA PERFORMANCE OF BEETHOVEN'S "SYMPHONY NO. 9")

TOLAN: On the roof of the guesthouse under a flapping French flag sits the man who envisioned all this, Palestinian violist Ramzi Aburedwan.

RAMZI ABUREDWAN: This idea came from my own story.

TOLAN: Ramzi was raised by his grandparents in a refugee camp near Ramallah. At age 8, he hurled stones at Israeli soldiers to expel them from occupied lands. Ten years later, he laid down his stone and picked up a viola.

ABUREDWAN: I thought that it was an amazing way of expressing myself. Music had helped me develop this frustration in a positive energy.

TOLAN: Ramzi was so taken by music he had a dream at age 18 to study in France, come home and build a music school for young Palestinians still living under occupation. Now he's brought all of Beethoven's symphonies to his music school, Al Kamandjati, culminating with the ninth and its message of universal brotherhood.

ABUREDWAN: The ninth symphony - it's one of the most beautiful piece that had been written, and its message to the world is joy and how much we need joy in Palestine.

(SOUNDBITE OF THE RAMALLAH ORCHESTRA PERFORMANCE OF BEETHOVEN'S "SYMPHONY NO. 9")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing in German).

TOLAN: Palestinians need permits to enter Jerusalem, and they're hard to get. Ramzi says when he applied for permits for his Ramallah Orchestra to perform the ninth, he was denied because you need a special reason.

ABUREDWAN: Beethoven and the orchestra is not a reason, you know?

TOLAN: For past Beethoven concerts in Jerusalem, members of Ramzi's Ramallah Orchestra risked prison, climbing the separation wall by ladder and slithering down by rope. This time, Ramzi traveled in disguise.

ABUREDWAN: Other Palestinian musicians had to be in the trunk of a car, you know?

TAYEB: So I came in a dangerous way. I had to cover myself with a blanket.

TOLAN: This 18-year-old violinist is using his first name only, Tayeb. As he lay under that blanket listening at the military checkpoint, he asked himself if he'd made the right decision. Was it really worth it to risk arrest just to play Beethoven?

TAYEB: I said, yeah. I must go 'cause it's important.

(SOUNDBITE OF THE RAMALLAH ORCHESTRA PERFORMANCE OF BEETHOVEN'S "SYMPHONY NO. 9")

TOLAN: Now the teenager's here with those 200 others playing in that big tent.

(SOUNDBITE OF THE RAMALLAH ORCHESTRA PERFORMANCE OF BEETHOVEN'S "SYMPHONY NO. 9")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing in German).

TOLAN: Three American musicians were refused entry by Israel and sent home, they say, when they admitted why they'd come, but the rest made it through from more than a dozen countries. Ramzi and his friends spent two years arranging the details.

HELENE LECOUER: I'm Helene Lecouer. I'm from France. We're all conscious that it's an incredible dream Ramzi had, and we want to help him to do that.

TOLAN: The musicians rehearse while an Israeli helicopter thunders over one movement.

(SOUNDBITE OF THE RAMALLAH ORCHESTRA PERFORMANCE OF BEETHOVEN'S "SYMPHONY NO. 9")

TOLAN: And the call to prayer echoes into another.

(SOUNDBITE OF THE RAMALLAH ORCHESTRA PERFORMANCE OF BEETHOVEN'S "SYMPHONY NO. 9")

TOLAN: Finally, it's the day of the first performance. The orchestra gathers for the short bus ride to Augusta Victoria Chapel in East Jerusalem. Majd Qadi is a Palestinian trombone player studying in Germany.

MAJD QADI: I have mixed feelings to be honest 'cause I'm in my favorite city on Earth doing the thing I love the most and yet, you know, just asking myself when am I going to be permitted here again if ever?

TOLAN: Majd, how did you get to Jerusalem this time?

QADI: I'd rather not talk about it, to be honest.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLS TOLLING)

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Vocalizing).

TOLAN: And so it begins. Ramzi sits in the viola section in the middle of the orchestra on the right. For him, the ninth symphony in Jerusalem seemed always meant to happen.

(SOUNDBITE OF THE RAMALLAH ORCHESTRA PERFORMANCE OF BEETHOVEN'S "SYMPHONY NO. 9")

ABUREDWAN: It's an amazing connection that brings me back to very, very old time, I mean, when I was very young, you know?

TOLAN: Ramzi was 5 living in the refugee camp with his grandparents who were forced to flee their village during the creation of Israel in 1948.

ABUREDWAN: And, you know, my grandfather worked in the municipality to clean the street. And sometimes he would find good things, you know, in the garbages. He found me a small teddy bear, yeah.

TOLAN: On the back of the bear, there was a little plastic ring attached to a string.

ABUREDWAN: And I pulled it, like, once and and would hear (vocalizing).

(SOUNDBITE OF THE RAMALLAH ORCHESTRA PERFORMANCE OF BEETHOVEN'S "SYMPHONY NO. 9")

ABUREDWAN: And today, we're doing the whole symphony. And every time when I listen to this in rehearsals, I just go back to this moment.

(SOUNDBITE OF THE RAMALLAH ORCHESTRA PERFORMANCE OF BEETHOVEN'S "SYMPHONY NO. 9")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing in German).

TOLAN: For NPR News, I'm Sandy Tolan. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.