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TOKYO — An American teenager has made history at the Tokyo Summer Olympics. 19-year-old Nevin Harrison became the first female from the U.S. to win a gold medal in the sport of canoe sprint.

By winning a new event, the Women's 200 meter Canoe Single, Harrison not only became the first U.S. woman to claim gold, but Games statisticians say she's only the third female teenager to win an Olympic canoe sprint race. Harrison beat her one-time idol and now rival, Canadian Laurence Vincent-Lapointe, who's won multiple world championships and took silver in the 200 meters.

British vaccinologist Sarah Gilbert now has a new accolade: It's a one-of-a-kind Barbie doll made in her image.

The Oxford University professor led the development of the Oxford/AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine. Last month she was given a damehood and now she shares her hairstyle, professional wardrobe and dark-rimmed glasses with Mattel Inc's new doll.

As coronavirus cases climb worryingly across the country, a recent study shows that the number of children contracting the virus "steadily increased" in July.

President Biden on Thursday will unveil proposed rules that would set new fuel efficiency and emissions standards for vehicles, surrounded by union officials and carmakers that the White House says are behind the direction he's headed.

Transportation is the country's largest source of greenhouse gases, and the updated standards are a central plank in Biden's plan to cut climate-changing emissions.

TOKYO — It was not the color medal the U.S. Women's National Soccer team had hoped to win at the Olympics. But the dominant 4-3 victory over Australia gave the top-ranked U.S. the bronze medal. In the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, the U.S. was bounced out of the Olympics in the quarterfinals.

TOKYO — Outside the Tokyo 2020 media press center and Olympic venues, amateur photographers are snapping pictures. Not of the people, but the hundreds of buses shuttling foreign journalists, athletes and officials.

You can spot the bus spotters snapping shots of the vehicles labeled with funny names in English, like "Ina Bus," and "Hiya, Tokyo." Lots of them are labeled with the Japanese word "kanko," meaning sightseeing.

Yuki Sato spends hours on one street corner, taking pictures of all the buses that pass him. Why? I ask.

"Hobby, hobby," he says. It's his hobby.

Maureen Nicholas says she had no ideal presidential candidate in the last election.

"I voted for Biden, but I didn't want to," the former Republican said as she walked across a Walmart parking lot in Easton, Pa.

Nicholas said she personally feels "lucky," but the overall economy feels "pretty bad" these days.

"Price increases — astronomical," she said. "Health care — it just seems like it's out of control."

In the days and weeks just ahead, the elected leaders of our federal government will perform a series of ritual dances that few Americans will understand.

You may turn away with a dismissive gesture or a rolling of the eyes. But these seemingly arcane exercises will, in fact, represent — and may even resolve — real conflicts over national issues of enormous importance.

TOKYO — American BMX racer and three-time Olympian Connor Fields is expected to be released from a Tokyo hospital on Thursday and fly home to the United States.

Fields, who won a gold medal at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, was racing in an Olympic BMX semifinal heat on July 30 when he crashed face first and suffered a brain hemorrhage and broken rib.

TOKYO — Ryan Crouser of the USA is golden again. He repeated as Olympic champion in the men's shot put equaling what he did in the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games. He also set an Olympic record in the process. Not once. Not twice. But three times.

On a sweltering day at the Olympic stadium, the big man put on a big performance. The 6-foot-7 inch, 320-pound Crouser broke the Olympic record three times in his six throws. And he saved the best for last.

Rihanna told us all along she was calling the shots. Out there, collecting money from all manner of ... people.

Now it turns out the singer, actress, cosmetics and lingerie mogul is a billionaire.

Not only that, she's become "the wealthiest female musician in the world and second to Oprah as the richest female entertainer," according to Forbes.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the director general of the World Health Organization, is now calling for a moratorium – for at least the next two months – on COVID booster shots.

"We should not accept countries that have already used most of the global supply of vaccines, using even more of it," he says, "while the world's most vulnerable people remain unprotected."

WHO is saying that people who are fully immunized against COVID should hold off on getting a third shot until more people around the world can get their first dose of a vaccine.

Facebook has blocked a team of New York University researchers studying political ads and COVID misinformation from accessing its site, a move that critics say is meant to silence research that makes the company look bad.

The researchers at the NYU Ad Observatory launched a tool last year to collect data about the political ads people see on Facebook. Around 16,000 people have installed the browser extension. It enables them to share data with the researchers about which ads the users are shown and why those ads were targeted at them.

Facebook says the company mistakenly blocked Jamaican gold medalist Elaine Thompson-Herah from Instagram.

Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona is batting away criticism that her bipartisan approach to legislating is bad for her party.

To Sinema, a moderate, bipartisanship is the way Washington should work.

"We know that the American people are asking for us to take action," she told NPR's All Things Considered. "What they don't want to see is us sit on our hands, waiting until we get every single thing that we want. ... That all-or-nothing approach usually leaves you with nothing."

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