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Local News

Positive Marks Go Out For Efforts To Deal With Snyderville Trail Pressures

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Leslie Thatcher
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The Summit County Council on Feb. 17 received a review of the Snyderville trail system.   Council Member Chris Robinson said he’s gratified that the Basin Recreation District has done a good job, overseeing a region straining with a lot of visitors from inside Summit County and outside.   

The County Council was concerned last year, in particular about visitors parking around hot-spot areas like Rob’s Trail in Sun Peak, and in Summit Park.   

Robinson told KPCW that he is glad to see the District actually doing something.     

“What we did was hire parking enforcement and changed the rules so that they can give parking citations and have enforcement, and made a big dent in the problems at the Park View trailhead in Summit Park and at Rob’s Trail.    And they did it in a way that was really responsible, where they issued warning citations and had a way of tracking those that had received previously a warning, in which case it advanced to one that would carry a fee.   I think they have a really good plan.   They convened a multi-disciplinary team to look at longer-term solutions.  But I thought it was a refreshing change from just talking about the problem.”

For the future, the county is trying to find alternative ways of getting to trailheads to cut down on individual car use.      

“Some of the longer-term solutions that we talked about was allowing for a more multi-modal access so that a vehicle wasn’t the only way.   Those included putting bike racks at some of the trailheads so that you could ride your bike to the trailhead instead of having to drive your car.  And then also, we discussed potential shuttles from park n ride locations.”

One listener told us that if dogs were allowed on public transit, there would be less incentive to use individual cars.    We asked Robinson about that. 

“Whether or not a dog could be on those shuttles is—whether there’s a shuttle to begin with is the first discussion, then whether to have pets on it is the second one.  I don’t think we would have right now an appreciable difference if we allowed dogs on buses.   That’s a bigger-term discussion.”

Summit County Council member Chris Robinson.

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