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PCMR Base Development Would Not Break Ground Until 2023 at the Earliest, Says Developer

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PEG Companies/HKS
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The complex discussions for the proposed base development at Park City Mountain Resort are slated to continue through the summer. Due to the delays in the process, the developer says the project won’t be underway until at least the spring of 2023.

 

The developer for the base area of Park City Mountain Resort, PEG Companies, originally hoped to break ground on their ambitious reimagining of the resort base this spring. Slow progress over the past year has now significantly delayed that goal by at least two years.

 

Robert Schmidt is the VP of Development for PEG and told KPCW the lack of a decision from the Park City Planning Commission means they have yet to begin drafting construction plans for the site, which means the groundbreaking is delayed until at least early 2023. 

 

“Well, at this point we would be able to start in the spring of 2023, and that’s just given the time that it takes to prepare construction plans,” Schmidt said. “At this point, we have not started those until we have a decision from planning commission. At this point, we’ve had to move some timeframes. We would not be able to start next spring, it would have to push out one year.”

 

PEG’s vision includes replacing the current surface-level parking with condominiums, a hotel, commercial space, and underground parking. PEG has been granted over 800,000 square feet of density at the site from the original 1998 development agreement, but that density clashes with current Park City restrictions on maximum building heights and other requirements.

 

After nearly 12 months of discussions, the members of the planning commission are still not satisfied with PEG’s proposal. Commissioner Laura Suesser said at the June 16th meeting PEG had yet to meet several objectives laid out in Park City’s general plan.

 

“Regarding the city’s general plan objectives, I find the applicant has only partially met objectives number one and seven,” said Seusser. “I find the other five objectives from the general plan lacking.”

 

Schmidt, on the other hand, maintains PEG’s plans are sound and in line with what was previously approved 23 years ago. 

 

“We are very similar to what was proposed in 98 in terms of building height,” he said. “That is somewhat due to the fact that there was a transfer of development credits and development rights from the mountain to the base area. It’s just a simple fact there’s so much stuff that you have to fit on that space and it has to be tall. That’s in line with the 98 plan, so we don’t feel like we’ve deviated from that at all. In fact, very much in line with it.”

 

Schmidt told KPCW he is hoping to finalize discussions with the planning commission over the next two months before a recommendation is given by the commission in August.

 

The next planning commission meeting about the PEG development is scheduled for July 21st.