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Wasatch County Emergency Management Encourages Residents To Prepare For Potential Flooding

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Wasatch County Emergency Management
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Wasatch County Emergency Management is asking residents to be prepared for potential flooding.

Wasatch County Emergency Management Director Jeremy Hales explains the risk of floods the county has at this time of year.

“It’s just with regards to the runoff of the water and with the rain that we’ll get in lieu of snow,” Hales explained. “Where the grounds frozen the ground doesn’t have the ability to soak in the moisture that we’re receiving. It just runs across the ground and causes a little bit of flooding to the homes that are around the creeks and maybe on some slopes that could come into their homes.”

Local stores that sell sandbags are ordering supplies to be ready. Hales notes who in particular should be prepared.

“If they’ve ever had any flooding instances around their properties, we would encourage them to buy sandbags at their local hardware or home improvement stores,” Hales continued. “Then when that precipitation comes to go out and walk around their properties and just make sure that the water’s diverted away from their homes and their structures so that it can safely get to the storm water systems that we have.”

County Emergency Management asks people to be proactive in the defense of their home and even suggests you consult an insurance agent to evaluate your flood insurance coverage.

“We just want people to be proactive in preparations for potential upcoming runoff,” Hales said. “If we have a heavy storm or we have an increase in temperature, we could have some flooding. We just need people to be prepared and take precautions for their selves and be proactive in that to make a better outcome for what could potentially happen. We’re not sending out an official message we’re just asking people to be proactive and take the time they can in the next few days to prepare around their properties and be safe.”

Should runoff be excessive, county and city sandbags would be used to protect critical infrastructure. Such as local government buildings, canal breaches and fresh water facilities.

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