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Arts & Culture
KPCW and the Park City Museum present Park City History BitsGet a taste of Park City history every week this summer with a new bit provided by the historians of the Park City Museum. A new nugget of history silver debuts every Thursday and replays throughout the week.0000017b-652b-d50a-a3ff-f7efae480000 This series of Park City History Bits is brought to you by the Park City Museum, where you can explore Park City history every day on Main Street, and sponsored by Julie Hopkins of Keller Williams Real Estate.

Park City History Bits - June 6, 2013

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Did you know you would have been pitied if you told folks you lived in Park City in the 19th century?

This is Bill Redeker with your weekly Park City History Bit.

 

Today’s prestige in having a Park City address didn’t exist in the 1800s. Park City was a dirty and polluted working-class town, made of modest wooden houses. Would you have come here? The air was polluted. So were the streams. The mountains had been stripped of trees. Yet people did come, to work in the mines and businesses, but very few got rich, and many died trying. Now more than 100 years later, Park City’s small miners’ cottages stand as a symbol of hope for those who came to work hard and try their lot at the mines.

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  This Park City History Bit is brought to you by the Park City Museum, where you can explore Park City history every day on Main Street, and sponsored by Julie Hopkins of Keller Williams Real Estate.

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