© 2022 KPCW

KPCW
Spencer F. Eccles Broadcast Center
PO Box 1372 | 460 Swede Alley
Park City | UT | 84060
Office: (435) 649-9004 | Studio: (435) 655-8255

Music & Artist Inquiries: music@kpcw.org
News Tips & Press Releases: news@kpcw.org
Volunteer Opportunities
General Inquiries: info@kpcw.org
Listen Like a Local
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Arts & Culture
KPCW and the Park City Museum present Park City History BitsGet a taste of Park City history every week this summer with a new bit provided by the historians of the Park City Museum. A new nugget of history silver debuts every Thursday and replays throughout the week.0000017b-652b-d50a-a3ff-f7efae480000 This series of Park City History Bits is brought to you by the Park City Museum, where you can explore Park City history every day on Main Street, and sponsored by Julie Hopkins of Keller Williams Real Estate.

Park City History Bits - May 30, 2013

PCHB_Hearst_400x600.jpg

What do the movie Citizen Kane and Park City have in common?

Park City shares part of its origin story with newspaper tycoon William Randolph Hearst – whom many people also believe the movie Citizen Kane is based on. Hearst’s father George Hearst was in Park City in 1872, when he met four men working a mining claim, and bought it for $27,000.

The elder Hearst’s Ontario Mine, located where Deer Valley Resort is now, became one of the most productive mines in Park City, generating approximately $50 million over the next 110 years. The Ontario Mine operated 3,000 feet below ground, with six shafts and hundreds of drifts.

Perhaps Park City’s most famous mine, it was also the last silver mine to operate, closing its doors in 1982.

Park_City_History_Bits_logo.jpg

This Park City History Bit is brought to you by the Park City Museum, where you can explore Park City history every day on Main Street, and sponsored by Julie Hopkins of Keller Williams Real Estate.

Related Content