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New speed limit signs going up around Park City

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Tanzi Propst/Park City Municipal
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Park City Mayor Nann Worel helps put up a new 20 mph speed limit sign on Payday Drive in the Thaynes neighborhood.

Park City government has begun putting up new road signs around town, following the city council’s approval of lower speed limits in October.

In a 3-2 vote, the council approved wide-ranging speed limit reductions for over 350 streets throughout the city. The swift changes are an effort to create safer road conditions, especially for pedestrians and cyclists.

Outside of Park Avenue and Swede Alley, the speed limit in Park City’s historic district will be 15 mph.

Speed limits on 330 streets will go from 25 mph to 20 mph, while 28 streets will change from 20 mph to 15 mph. The speed limits also apply to bicycles.

The city began putting up signs this month. The Prospector neighborhood is now complete, and Thaynes Canyon is currently a work in progress, according to city spokesman Clayton Scrivner.

After that, the order of work is Deer Valley, Old Town, and then Park Meadows.

SR-224 and SR-248 are not impacted, as those are state roads managed by UDOT.

The move follows the unanimous decision by the Salt Lake City Council in May to lower the residential area speed limit from 25 mph to 20 mph. The decision impacts about 70% of Salt Lake City’s streets.

If there are enough complaints about particular roads, the new rules could be adjusted. Park City residents can appeal through the city’s Neighborhood First program.

A link to program information and a full map of speed limit changes can be found in the online version of this report here.

Parker Malatesta covers Park City for KPCW. Before coming to NPR, he spent one year as a general assignment reporter for TownLift in Park City. He previously was the news editor at The News Record, the student paper at the University of Cincinnati. He loves running, reading, and urban planning.