Nell Larson

Producer/ Co-Host

Co-host of KPCW's This Green Earth.

Nell Larson has been the director of Swaner Preserve and EcoCenter since 2013, but has been a co-host of This Green Earth since 2009.  Prior to her role as director at Swaner, Nell acted as Conservation Director, where she focused on the restoration and management of the 1,200 acre nature preserve, implementing projects geared toward stream restoration, water quality, wildlife habitat, and trails.  Nell grew up in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York.  She completed her undergraduate degree at Yale, as well as her master of Environmental Management with a focus in ecology at the Yale School of Forestry.  Outside of work, Nell loves to ski - both Nordic and alpine - sail, hike, travel, kickball, and generally take advantage of Utah's great outdoors.

Ways to Connect

On This Green Earth, Jeff Bousson, Climate Program Manager for Utah Clean Energy, joins Nell and Chris to discuss opportunities to address the climate as it continues to change. 

Bousson breaks down a year-long program Utah Clean Energy just wrapped, which involved local citizen input on energy use, efficiency and reduction.

On This Green Earth, Jordan Clayton, Data Collection Officer with Utah Snow Survey, joins the show to share the outcome of the Utah Water Supply Outlook Report for May. 

The lack of snow over the season has made a grim impact on our water supplies. Clayton says that ninety percent of our state is in an extreme drought situation and Lake Powell could even see a record low this year.

On This Green Earth, Recycle Utah Executive Director Carolyn Wawra comes on the show. 

Wawra gives us the lowdown regarding this year's Hazardous Waste Drop Off Day, which took place on April 24.

Each year, this event helps to ensure toxic waste items are disposed of properly. 

On This Green Earth, joining the show is Diana Movius, Director of Global Forest Policy with the non-profit group, Climate Advisers.

Movius discusses the actions of private businesses and countries who are developing financial incentives to protect and preserve threatened tropical rain forests.

On This Green Earth, author Jon Dunn, talks about his new book: "The Glitter in the Green: In Search of Hummingbirds".

Dunn's book chronicles his tracking of various hummingbird species, and teaches us about their incredible biomechanics and interesting behaviors.

 

  

On This Green Earth, Nell and Chris speak with Dr. Mark Chynoweth, an assistant professor of Wildland Resources for Utah State University. Chynoweth specializes in carnivore ecology.

In Park City, predator sightings seem to be increasing. It isn’t uncommon to see coyotes, bobcats and mountain lions in residential areas. Chynoweth will address the human-wildlife conflict and how we can safely co-exist with these large predators.

On This Green Earth, Alaska-based journalist Yereth Rosen lights up the conversation with a discussion on Arctic lightning.

In a single decade, summer lightning tripled across the Arctic, a change directly attributed to rapid Arctic warming. Rosen recently wrote an article for Arctic Today about this trend. She will provide an overview of this important data.

On This Green Earth, joining Nell and Chris is Dr. Robert Davies, a professor of Physics at Utah State University.

Davies has published numerous works on the Earth’s climate system and continues to study critical science communication, principally focused on climate change and human sustainability. 

He'll be sharing the latest on climate change and what it means for mountain communities such as Park City. 

  

On This Green Earth: Secretary of the Interior, Deb Haaland visited Bears Ears and the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments last week. This is the first time a Native American will be in charge of shaping federal policies on public lands and waters.

Nell and Chris will be talking about this visit and the possibilities of expanding the reach of these two monuments with Bluff City Councilman Jim Sayers.

On This Green Earth, Nell and Chris take a closer look at Arctic Sea Ice.

The Arctic Sea Ice reached its maximum surface area around the middle of March this year.  What was the extent of its coverage, and how much of it has already begun to melt due to the combination of natural and man-made warming?

Walt Meier, senior research scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center comes on the show to answer these questions. 

On This Green Earth, Utah Rivers Council Campaign Director Jon Carter talks about the return of the Rain Barrel Program, and why they are so important to those of us who live in a drought-impacted, high desert environment.

The Utah Rivers Council, in collaboration with Park City Municipal Corporation is once again offering Rain Barrels for sale starting April 6. 

The barrels will range in price between $50 and $75 and, be available for pickup beginning May 2. 

 

On This Green Earth, Flooding from rising seas is a present and increasing threat to coastal communities around the world. 

Oceanographer John Englander presents his new book: Moving to Higher Ground – Rising Sea Level and the Path Forward. In his first interview since the book launched, Englander talks with Chris and Nell about exploring how sea level rise will affect our ecosystems, our economies, our water supplies and our daily lives. 

His book also covers the strategies and adaptations required to tackle the inevitability of a rising sea.

On This Green Earth, Nathan Donley from the Center for Biological Diversity joins Nell and Chris to discuss a recent federal study which found 90% of streams sampled contain pesticides.   

Nathan will share the acute and chronic ecological impacts that are associated with this condition in our waterways. 

Birders around the world are rejoicing with the rediscovery of a bird that has not been seen for 180 years. 

The illusive Black-browed Babbler has been captured, photographed and then released back into the tropical forest of Borneo. 

Dr. John Mittermeier of the American Bird Conservancy talks with Nell and Chris about this unique feathered creature, its accidental capture, and why its rediscovery is so important to both birders and conservationists.   

Today on This Green Earth:

Sean Sublette from Climate Central is talking about last week’s record-breaking cold temps in the Midwest and Southern U.S.

Sublette will have answers about what role the jet stream played in this event, and the influences a warming planet can have on the jet stream.

Sublette also lets us know if we should expect more cold snaps like this, even as the planet warms.

Pages