Friends Of The Park City Library Hosting Author Luncheon On October 16th

Oct 8, 2019

Credit University of Utah Press

Friends of the Park City library are hosting their annual author luncheon on Wednesday October 16th in the Silver Lake Lodge at Deer Valley.

The luncheon will revolve around the book “Reimagining: A Place for the Wild” the featured speaker will be local author and editor of the book Leslie Miller. She said the book came about from a joint project between philanthropists in Montana along with the University of Utah’s college of humanities. The groups worked together to create an environmental humanities center in Centennial Valley, Montana.

“I organized this symposium in collaboration with the University,” Miller explained. “We invited 24 panelists with all very diverse backgrounds. The idea was to have a very diverse group of people with different perspectives about the environment, and wildlife, and ranching, and art. They all spoke and I asked them to write an essay. Those essays were going to be compiled into a white paper report, but they were so brilliant they were so beautiful we decided to compile them into a manuscript.”

Miller says they took 17 of the speeches from the symposium and used those essays to create the book. Three of the authors of essays that appear in the book will also be speaking at the luncheon.

“Kerry Gee who is the vice president of United Park City Mines has been working for a couple decades reclaiming the mine tailings and waterways and has restored them to ecologically balanced wetlands,” Miller continued. “We have Wendy Fisher who is the director of Utah Open Lands and writes a beautiful essay about the process of acquiring Toll Canyon, and what that was like. Then we've invited Erin Holcomb. Erin is coming in from the San Juan islands and she has written a lovely essay. She was the former program director at the center in Centennial Valley.”

Additionally, an original art exhibit of Bill Kranstovers work will be on display, he provided the cover art for the book.

Miller explains the link between the humanities and the environment.

“Rather than using the language of science, which of course the basis of our stories relies on scientific fact, but rather than using the language of science or the language of politics to try to influence and convince people that we are in a biodiversity crisis; we believe that story can really have an equal if not greater impact,” Miller said. “What we're trying to do is inspire the will to act for human and natural world prosperity.”

Tickets to the luncheon can be bought at the Park City Library for $42.